Jean-Pierre Granger

Portrait of a Lady, bust length

Jean-Pierre Granger (Paris 1779 - 1840)

Portrait of a Lady, bust length, wearing a blue feathered bonnet.

 

Enquire about this painting:  anna@agnewsgallery.com

Description

Granger, a French painter who worked in the Neo-Classical style, is primarily known for portraits, although he also created history paintings, mythological scenes and religious works.

Jean-Pierre Granger (Paris 1779 - 1840)

Portrait of a Lady, bust length, wearing a blue feathered bonnet.

Signed with monogram:  JPG

Oil on oval canvas

25 ½ x 17 ¾ inches (65 x 45 cm.)

During his youth he worked closely with both Jacques-Louis David and also Jean-August-Dominique Ingres, who he competed with for the Prix de Rome and won in 1800. Ingres was not very happy coming second to Granger and accused David of using his influence on the jury. However, the artists later became close friends, and Ingres was godfather to Granger’s daughter. A pencil drawing by Ingres of Granger is in the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra.

While working in Rome for Lucien Bonaparte, Granger began a portrait of Bonaparte's wife, Maria Letizia, but finding it unsatisfactory he turned it into a painting of an anonymous lady of the court, for whom the model was Jeanne-Catherine Delaigle, who he later married (Louvre, Paris) This sensitive portrait of his future wife, and the exquisitely beautiful handing of the present painting, both  show Ingres’ influence on the young Granger.